Season One of The Pledge Podcast features six stories of women activists in Alabama. Inspired by the surprising victory of Democrat Doug Jones in the 2017 special election for the Senate, we reached out to learn more.

Listen to episodes below, or subscribe now on Apple Podcasts, Google Play or Stitcher.

Six Stories


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Elizabeth Shannon, Political Organizer

After Elizabeth lost her sister to cancer right before the 2016 national election, she sought to honor her sister’s political passions by diving into getting out the vote in Alabama. Elizabeth organized canvassers and launched the “Women for Doug” Facebook page to support winning Senate candidate Doug Jones, collecting over 5,000 members within the first week.

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Stacie Propst, Emerge Alabama

After experiencing first-hand the uphill battles of Alabama politics as leader of a nonprofit fighting for clean air, Stacie is determined to change the political landscape leading Emerge Alabama, part of a national organization focused on training more Democratic women leaders.

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Oni Williams, Community Activist

As a resident of one of Birmingham’s poorest neighborhoods, Oni regularly visits barbershops and strip clubs to speak with members of the community, to inform them of their rights and encourage them to speak out.

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Ashley Smith, Attorney

After campaigning hard to become the first African American judge in the county’s all-white judicial system, Ashley feels more determined than ever in her ability and calling to lead, despite losing the primary.

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Nancy Deabler, Educator

After devoting much of her life challenging racism and corporal punishment as an education administrator, this wife of a Methodist minister now speaks openly, and works determinedly, to get out the vote.

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Mary Wilson, Activist

Mary spent most of her life keeping her progressive views silent in order to protect her husband’s corporate career. Now in retirement, she revels in her freedom to march, openly support campaigns, and speak her mind about the ways national and state healthcare policies hurt her family.